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Post Processing As A Conversation - Part Two

The Drama Of Silence V2Point Halswell Lighthouse, Wellington

Building on the thoughts from my last blog post, conversations are fragile, tenuous things. They are influenced easily, by the people having the conversation, the environment or even the knowledge available. Can you think back to a conversation that you would wish to have again? One that could have gone better if only....?

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Post Processing As A Conversation

Lenticular CloudMount Taranaki

I must admit when I heard this phrase earlier in the week, it caught my attention. With all of the one click, attention grabbing, cliche filters out there, it would seem hard to believe. But even with these, despite the briefness of the exchange, the content of the image does plays some role in the final choice of settings.

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Spring Showers Over Mt Tauhara

ShowersMt Tauhara, Lake Taupo

Some images take longer to process than others, longer to find the right balance and mood. To bring out the qualities in the image that first attracted you. To show the viewer of the image what you saw. That is no surprise, each image brings its own unique qualities, and challenges. Part of learning how to post process images is learning to recognise the issues and the techniques that can best take advantage of them.

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Process What You Feel

Summer StormManawatu

Cameras are great at capturing what is in front of them, technically the challenge is getting easier and easier. But a photo can be much more than that. I don't know if you have heard the expression, "Shoot what you feel, not just what you see", but it is great advice if you want your images to be more interesting. But I think the expression continues into the phases after you press the shutter release. "Process what you feel", bring out what you felt, the mood, the emotion, the drama. But how do you do that? Sometimes I know what I want but can't quite get there, that is when I use this method.

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Noise Reduction That Works

NZ1015North American Harvard (T6- Texan)

To get the best out of any tool, there is always a learning curve. Most of us if we are honest try the easiest option first, especially if there is an auto button that works reasonably well. When I first tried Nik Define, that was how I used it, I clicked the "Auto" button. But was I really happy how it worked, no not really. I suppose I put it down to an older camera and the fact that you can reduce noise but not remove it. After all is noise really that bad? Well I still believe you can't remove noise totally but the results I get out of this tool are much better. So how do I do it, read on...

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